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Showing posts from April, 2009

what an ass

The fate of patients with persistent widespread pain labeled as FM stands in reproach to whatever theory underpins this sophistical treatment act. In the community, the majority of people with persistent widespread pain improve with time12. That is not the fate of those who become patients and are labeled FM. Based on the science that pertains to the regional musculoskeletal disorders, I would suggest that this unhappy fate is not solely a reflection of the intensity of their symptoms or the pervasiveness of the psychosocial factors that confounded their coping so that they chose to be patients in the first place. I would suggest that the treatment acts, dripping with empty promises of elucidation and unproved promises of palliation, are iatrogenic. I would further suggest that these circular treatment acts will exacerbate whatever mood or thought disorder is complicating the plight of these patients13.



NORTIN M. HADLER says "I suspect that few suffering with persistent chronic p…

Should rheumatologists treat fibromyalgia patients?

I do believe there are patients who have widespread musculoskeletal pain attributed to a syndrome we call fibromyalgia. However, I do not believe rheumatologists should be the "main caregivers for these patients," as Pisetsky and others have suggested. We simply treat these patients by default. The main reason for my stance is the lack of any creditable evidence supporting fibromyalgia as a rheumatologic condition other than the existence of chronic pain. Although rheumatic diseases are often associated with chronic pain, the converse is not necessarily true. With the burgeoning entrepreneurial specialty masquerading as "pain management," my opinion is that these patients would be best served by those who claim to be pain specialists—if only we could get them to put their needles down long enough to actually treat the pain and the patient.




Dr Pisetsky states FMS is not a rheumatic diseases and therefore not under the realm of what a rheumatologist should be treatin…

Results from sleep study...

Were rather disapointing. Actually they were good. I was in range for my pauses of breathing, in range for the amount of kicking and movement, and had plenty of oxygen through the night. All very good things, but nothing that helps me with answers or get a better sleep. I have decided from all the muscle jerks at night, I should start taking magnesium to help with it. But I don't know about the rest, the whole waking up not breathing bit... maybe one of the pillows designed to help you breath better when you sleeping. Since I obviously am breathing well most of the time, it must be something not often, so I don't have to worry about it. So I am left with just my usual sleeping disorders really, which are quite enough.

Of all the things I miss, I miss my mind the most

This whole spring migraine season is toally messing me up. In my moments of clarity I realize I am having a great deal of trouble remembering things. A whole lot of things. Whether I took my pills in the morning. Whether I paid the bills this month. The whole month of March is a haze of remembering and forgetting. Obviously when I am having a migraine this is more pronounced. I forget names, how to do simple tasks, important facts of a conversation while having a conversation. Constant migraines pretty much mean the inability to process long term memories, which leads to a whole lot of forgetting on my part. So on the rare occasions when I do not have a migraine I try to think back and I totally come up blank on a great deal. Then you start getting that wierd surreal feeling and feel just out of sorts. I can't say I like it. There are just portions of your life that are just stumbled throung blindly and forgotten. It is no wonder time seems to go by so fast, when you …

New Migraine awareness blog

Migraine Journey is a new blog"Last year I compiled, edited and published the book, Migraine Expressions: A Creative Journey through Life with Migraine to try and help dispel the myths of migraine via the words and art of people who live with it." -Betsy Baxter Blondin, Editor

I was one of the contributors to that collection and am happy to see she has created a blog.

It's all in the details...

Managing FMS and chronic migraines is all about balance. Too much of anything is never a good thing. Any change to routine can spell catastrophe. So many details and nuances that it is impossible to always succeed in avoiding triggers, but at least you can do damage control and strive for some sort of balance. But that does not imply stability, because any treatment can fail suddenly and things like life happen. Sometimes I wish I could grasp the patterns behind migraines, because sometimes when you are having a real bad month these migraine free, headache free, no pre-migraine or migraine crash, days comes out of nowhere and it would sure be cool if I knew why. The fact that spring is not kind to me has to do with both FMS and migraines; the light changes hurt both, but also FMS with its whole syndrome symptoms has unexplainable allergies amongst other things, and of course there is the simple amped up pain factor with weather changes in both conditions.

So I am a little concer…