MRI brain scans show FM 'brain signature'

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In the study found the journal of Pain August 31, 2016 it looks like they may have found a way to diagnosis Fibromyalgia using MRI scans. They identified a brain signature that specifically characterizes fibromyalgia central pathophysiology at the neural system level using fMRI.
The study included 37 FM patients matched with 35 healthy controls; and it analyzed responses to a) painful pressure and b) non-painful multisensory (visual-auditory-tactile) stimulation with a fMRI machine. 
We used machine-learning techniques to identify a brain-based FM signature. When exposed to the same painful stimuli, FM patients showed greater Neurologic Pain Signature (NPS, Wager 2013) responses. In addition, a new pain-related classifier ('FM-pain') revealed augmented responses in sensory integration (insula/operculum) and self-referential (e.g., medial prefrontal) regions in FM, and reduced responses in the lateral frontal cortex. A 'Multisensory' classifier trained on non-painful sensory stimulation revealed augmented responses in insula/operculum, posterior cingulate, and medial prefrontal regions, and reduced responses in primary/secondary sensory cortices, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Combined activity in the NPS, FM-pain, and Multisensory patterns classified patients vs. controls with 92% sensitivity and 94% specificity in out-of-sample individuals. Enhanced NPS responses partly mediated mechanical hypersensitivity, and correlated with depression and disability(puncorrected<0 .05="" and="" clinical="" correlated="" fm-pain="" multisensory="" p="" pain="" puncorrected="" responses="" with="">
If this can be replicated this characterization based on pathophysiological, symptom-related brain features may enable for objective neural targets for therapeutic interventions. It looks to be about 93% accurate. 
"The novelty of this study is that it provides potential neuroimaging-based tools that can be used with new patients to inform about the degree of certain neural pathology underlying their pain symptoms," said Marina López-Solà, a post-doctoral researcher at CU Boulder and lead author of a study published in the journalPain. "This is a helpful first step that builds off of other important previous work and is a natural step in the evolution of our understanding of fibromyalgia as a brain disorder."
One patient advocate calls the use of MRI brain scans a breakthrough in fibromyalgia research.
"New cutting-edge neurological imaging used by CU Boulder researchers advances fibromyalgia research by light years," said Jan Chambers, founder of the National Fibromyalgia & Chronic Pain Association. "It allows scientists to see in real time what is happening in the brains of people with fibromyalgia. 
"In fibromyalgia, the misfiring and irregular engagement of different parts of the brain to process normal sensory stimuli like light, sound, pressure, temperature and odor, results in pain, flu-like sensations or other symptoms.  Research also shows that irregular activity in the peripheral nervous system may be ramping up the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord).  So the effect is like a loop of maladjustment going back and forth while the brain is trying to find a balance.  This extra brain work can be exhausting." 
Pain News Network

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